ECTS Abstracts (2015) 1 P275

The Fracture Patient Phenotype: Bone and Fall-Related Risk Factors in Patients at the Fracture Liaison Service

Lisanne Vranken1,2, Caroline Wyers1,2, Robert van der Velde1, Marcel Janssen3, Piet Geusens4,5 & Joop van den Bergh1,2


1Department of Internal Medicine, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, The Netherlands; 2Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 3Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, The Netherlands; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Subdivision Rheumatology, CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 5Biomedical Research Centre, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium.


Background: Fractures are the result of bone- and fall-related risk factors. We evaluated the prevalence of both bone- and fall-related risk factors in patients visiting the Fracture Liaison Service (FLS).

Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of all consecutive patients with a recent fracture visiting the FLS for fracture risk evaluation.

Results: Out of 3,057 patients aged 50-90 years, 1,111 consecutive patients who were able and willing to be evaluated at the FLS, were included (71% women, mean age 65.2 yrs.), 8% with a hip, 29% with a major, 57% with a minor and 6% with a finger or toe fracture. At least one bone- or fall-related risk factor was present in respectively 90% and 83% of the total population. At least one fall-related risk factor was more frequently present in women (women vs. men: 86% vs. 78%, p=.002) and at higher age (80-89 vs. 50-59 yrs.: 100% vs. 76%, p=<.001). At least one bone-related risk factor was more frequently present in women (women vs. men: 91% vs. 87%, p=.043), with lower BMD (osteoporosis vs. normal BMD: 94% vs. 83%, p=<.001), with more severe fx (hip vs. finger or toe fx: 90% vs. 88%, p=.016) and with higher age (80-89 vs. 50-59 yrs.: 100% vs. 83.7%, p=<.001). Most patients had a combination of bone- and fall-related risks (77%), 12% had only bone-related risks, 6% had fall-related risks and only 4% had no bone- or fall-related risk.

Conclusion: Four out of five patients with a recent fracture presenting at the FLS have a combination of bone- and fall-related risk factors. Therefore, careful evaluation of both bone and fall-related risk factors at the FLS will contribute to optimal fracture risk evaluation and to decisions about further fall and fracture prevention.

Disclosure: The authors declared no competing interests.

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